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Learning the JavaFX Script Programming Language - Tutorial Overview

This JavaFX tutorial is your starting point for learning the JavaFX Script programming language. It focuses on the fundamentals only: that is, on the underlying, non-visual, core constructs that are common to all FX applications.

Contents of this JavaFX fundamental tutorial

  •  Lesson 1: Getting Started with JavaFX Script — Provides software download and installation instructions, plus a discussion on choosing an appropriate development environment.
  •  Lesson 2: Writing Scripts — Provides an introduction to compiling source code, running an application, declaring script variables, and invoking script functions.
  • Lesson 3: Using Objects — Provides an introduction to objects, showing how to declare an object literal and how to invoke an object's functions.
  •  Lesson 4: Data Types — Discusses the built-in data types String, Number, Integer, Boolean and Duration, plus the use of Void and null.
  •  Lesson 5: Sequences — Introduces the sequences data structure, which is used to store and manipulate a list of objects. This lesson discusses how to create, use, and compare sequences and their subsets (called slices).
  •  Lesson 6: Operators — Introduces the supported operators (assignment, arithmetic, unary, relational, conditional and type comparison).
  •  Lesson 7: Expressions — The JavaFX Script programming language is an expression language. This lesson explains what that means, and discusses the different types of expressions that are available for you to use.
  •  Lesson 8: Data Binding and Triggers — One of the most powerful features of the JavaFX Script programming language is the ability to automatically synchronize a GUI with its underlying data. This lesson explores the basic mechanics of the data binding and trigger constructs.
  • Lesson 9: Writing Your Own Classes — The JavaFX API provides a large number of classes for you to use in your applications. There may be times, however, when you will want to write a custom class of your own design. This lesson explores the basics of what is involved when doing so.
  •  Lesson 10: Packages — Placing your source files into named packages will make your code more organized in terms of namespace management. This lesson explores the creation and use of packages with a step-by-step example that walks you through the various considerations.
  •  Lesson 11: Access Modifiers — Access modifiers are used to specify various levels of visibility for your variables, functions and classes. This lesson explores the available access modifiers, and discusses what happens when no access modifier is provided.


Resource: http://java.sun.com/javafx/1/tutorials/core/Learning%20the%20JavaFX%20Script%20Programming%20Language.pdf
Posted By : JavaFX tutorials
On date : 03.19.10

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